Amber Laurin's Blog

PRactice makes perfect… my first blog!

TOW 11: Infographics November 30, 2010

Filed under: PRCA 3330,TOWS — amberlaurin @ 3:59 pm

Infographics according to Search Engine Land “are visual devices that communicate information or data in an easily digestible manner.” They have been used by computer scientists, mathematicians, and statisticians for many years to ease the process of communicating conceptual information, support it, strengthen it and present it within a provoking and sensitive context. Infographics are image-based and usually contain very little text. Images speak a thousand words especially when images are used together to visualize an architecture of information.

Infographics would be useful in creating a story for a client because it provides a visually appealing and neatly organized presentation to viewers. If your piece is not appealing than social media users will be less likely to read information or view your page. They also have the power to make dull data more interesting. Search Engine Land says that, “This is important in capturing a user’s immediate attention and directing their eyes through a visual flow of information in a timely fashion. Infographics have a higher chance of becoming viral and being shared with friends online.”

Sites to help you create an infographic:

Here are a few examples of infographics that I found online.  Each of these is very different in purpose and presentation of information but is also very appealing to the eye.

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One Response to “TOW 11: Infographics”

  1. Those are three fantastic infographics you’ve found, Amber! I particularly like the way the very shape of the graphic elements is reflective of the content/meaning: e.g. the wave patterns made by the 3d bar chart in the second example about fish populations, and the mind-blowing complexity of the “red tape” example. You make the point that infographics, well done, are more than data expressed as pretty pictures, but the graphic elements themselves can help to carry the message. Thanks so much for sharing these – and I hope we’ll see some of your own infographics one of these days, too!


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